Service Name and Transport Protocol Port Number Registry

Last Updated
2014-11-21
Expert(s)
TCP/UDP: Joe Touch; Eliot Lear, Allison Mankin, Markku Kojo, Kumiko Ono, Martin Stiemerling, Lars Eggert, Alexey Melnikov and Wes Eddy; 
    DCCP: Eddie Kohler; SCTP: Allison Mankin
Reference
[RFC6335]
Note
Service names and port numbers are used to distinguish between different
services that run over transport protocols such as TCP, UDP, DCCP, and
SCTP.

Service names are assigned on a first-come, first-served process, as
documented in [RFC6335].

Port numbers are assigned in various ways, based on three ranges: System
Ports (0-1023), User Ports (1024-49151), and the Dynamic and/or Private
Ports (49152-65535); the difference uses of these ranges is described in
[RFC6335]. System Ports are assigned by IETF
process for standards-track protocols, as per [RFC6335].  User Ports
are assigned by IANA using the "IETF Review" process, the "IESG 
Approval" process, or the "Expert Review" process, as per
[RFC6335].  Dynamic Ports are not assigned.

The registration procedures for service names and port numbers are
described in [RFC6335].

Assigned ports both System and User ports SHOULD NOT be used without
or prior to IANA registration.

************************************************************************
* PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING:                                           *
*                                                                      *
* ASSIGNMENT OF A PORT NUMBER DOES NOT IN ANY WAY IMPLY AN             *
* ENDORSEMENT OF AN APPLICATION OR PRODUCT, AND THE FACT THAT NETWORK  *
* TRAFFIC IS FLOWING TO OR FROM A REGISTERED PORT DOES NOT MEAN THAT   *
* IT IS "GOOD" TRAFFIC, NOR THAT IT NECESSARILY CORRESPONDS TO THE     *
* ASSIGNED SERVICE. FIREWALL AND SYSTEM ADMINISTRATORS SHOULD          *
* CHOOSE HOW TO CONFIGURE THEIR SYSTEMS BASED ON THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF    *
* THE TRAFFIC IN QUESTION, NOT WHETHER THERE IS A PORT NUMBER          *
* REGISTERED OR NOT.                                                   *
************************************************************************
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Service Name Port Number Transport Protocol Description Assignee Contact Registration Date Modification Date Reference Service Code Known Unauthorized Uses Assignment Notes
mpm-snd 46 tcp MPM [default send] [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
mpm-snd 46 udp MPM [default send] [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
ni-ftp 47 tcp NI FTP [Steve_Kille] [Steve_Kille]
ni-ftp 47 udp NI FTP [Steve_Kille] [Steve_Kille]
auditd 48 tcp Digital Audit Daemon [Larry_Scott] [Larry_Scott]
auditd 48 udp Digital Audit Daemon [Larry_Scott] [Larry_Scott]
tacacs 49 tcp Login Host Protocol (TACACS) [Pieter_Ditmars] [Pieter_Ditmars]
tacacs 49 udp Login Host Protocol (TACACS) [Pieter_Ditmars] [Pieter_Ditmars]
re-mail-ck 50 tcp Remote Mail Checking Protocol [Steve_Dorner] [Steve_Dorner]
re-mail-ck 50 udp Remote Mail Checking Protocol [Steve_Dorner] [Steve_Dorner]
51 Reserved 2013-05-24 This entry is being removed on 2013-05-24.
xns-time 52 tcp XNS Time Protocol [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
xns-time 52 udp XNS Time Protocol [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
domain 53 tcp Domain Name Server [Paul_Mockapetris] [Paul_Mockapetris]
domain 53 udp Domain Name Server [Paul_Mockapetris] [Paul_Mockapetris]
xns-ch 54 tcp XNS Clearinghouse [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
xns-ch 54 udp XNS Clearinghouse [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
isi-gl 55 tcp ISI Graphics Language
isi-gl 55 udp ISI Graphics Language
xns-auth 56 tcp XNS Authentication [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
xns-auth 56 udp XNS Authentication [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
57 tcp any private terminal access [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
57 udp any private terminal access [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
xns-mail 58 tcp XNS Mail [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
xns-mail 58 udp XNS Mail [Susie_Armstrong] [Susie_Armstrong]
59 tcp any private file service [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
59 udp any private file service [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
60 tcp Unassigned
60 udp Unassigned
ni-mail 61 tcp NI MAIL [Steve_Kille] [Steve_Kille]
ni-mail 61 udp NI MAIL [Steve_Kille] [Steve_Kille]
acas 62 tcp ACA Services [E_Wald] [E_Wald]
acas 62 udp ACA Services [E_Wald] [E_Wald]
whoispp 63 tcp whois++

IANA assigned this well-formed service name as a replacement for "whois++".
[Rickard_Schoultz] [Rickard_Schoultz]
whois++ 63 tcp whois++ [Rickard_Schoultz] [Rickard_Schoultz] This entry is an alias to "whoispp". This entry is now historic, not usable for use with many common service discovery mechanisms.
whoispp 63 udp whois++

IANA assigned this well-formed service name as a replacement for "whois++".
[Rickard_Schoultz] [Rickard_Schoultz]
whois++ 63 udp whois++ [Rickard_Schoultz] [Rickard_Schoultz] This entry is an alias to "whoispp". This entry is now historic, not usable for use with many common service discovery mechanisms.
covia 64 tcp Communications Integrator (CI) [Dan_Smith] [Dan_Smith]
covia 64 udp Communications Integrator (CI) [Dan_Smith] [Dan_Smith]
tacacs-ds 65 tcp TACACS-Database Service [Kathy_Huber] [Kathy_Huber]
tacacs-ds 65 udp TACACS-Database Service [Kathy_Huber] [Kathy_Huber]
sql-net 66 tcp Oracle SQL*NET

IANA assigned this well-formed service name as a replacement for "sql*net".
[Jack_Haverty] [Jack_Haverty]
sql*net 66 tcp Oracle SQL*NET [Jack_Haverty] [Jack_Haverty] This entry is an alias to "sql-net". This entry is now historic, not usable for use with many common service discovery mechanisms.
sql-net 66 udp Oracle SQL*NET

IANA assigned this well-formed service name as a replacement for "sql*net".
[Jack_Haverty] [Jack_Haverty]
sql*net 66 udp Oracle SQL*NET [Jack_Haverty] [Jack_Haverty] This entry is an alias to "sql-net". This entry is now historic, not usable for use with many common service discovery mechanisms.
bootps 67 tcp Bootstrap Protocol Server [Bill_Croft] [Bill_Croft] [RFC951] Defined TXT keys: None
bootps 67 udp Bootstrap Protocol Server
bootpc 68 tcp Bootstrap Protocol Client [Bill_Croft] [Bill_Croft]
bootpc 68 udp Bootstrap Protocol Client [Bill_Croft] [Bill_Croft]
tftp 69 tcp Trivial File Transfer [David_Clark] [David_Clark]
tftp 69 udp Trivial File Transfer [David_Clark] [David_Clark]
gopher 70 tcp Gopher [Mark_McCahill] [Mark_McCahill]
gopher 70 udp Gopher [Mark_McCahill] [Mark_McCahill]
netrjs-1 71 tcp Remote Job Service
netrjs-1 71 udp Remote Job Service
netrjs-2 72 tcp Remote Job Service
netrjs-2 72 udp Remote Job Service
netrjs-3 73 tcp Remote Job Service
netrjs-3 73 udp Remote Job Service
netrjs-4 74 tcp Remote Job Service [Bob_Braden] [Bob_Braden]
netrjs-4 74 udp Remote Job Service [Bob_Braden] [Bob_Braden]
75 tcp any private dial out service [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
75 udp any private dial out service [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
deos 76 tcp Distributed External Object Store [Robert_Ullmann] [Robert_Ullmann]
deos 76 udp Distributed External Object Store [Robert_Ullmann] [Robert_Ullmann]
77 tcp any private RJE service [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
77 udp any private RJE service [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
vettcp 78 tcp vettcp [Christopher_Leong] [Christopher_Leong]
vettcp 78 udp vettcp [Christopher_Leong] [Christopher_Leong]
finger 79 tcp Finger [David_Zimmerman] [David_Zimmerman] Unauthorized use by some mail users (see [RFC4146] for details)
finger 79 udp Finger [David_Zimmerman] [David_Zimmerman] Unauthorized use by some mail users (see [RFC4146] for details)
http 80 tcp World Wide Web HTTP Defined TXT keys: u=<username> p=<password> path=<path to document>
http 80 udp World Wide Web HTTP Defined TXT keys: u=<username> p=<password> path=<path to document>
www 80 tcp World Wide Web HTTP This is a duplicate of the "http" service and should not be used for discovery purposes.
www 80 udp World Wide Web HTTP This is a duplicate of the "http" service and should not be used for discovery purposes.
www-http 80 tcp World Wide Web HTTP [Tim_Berners_Lee] [Tim_Berners_Lee] This is a duplicate of the "http" service and should not be used for discovery purposes. u=<username> p=<password> path=<path to document> (see txtrecords.html#http) Known Subtypes: _printer NOTE: The meaning of this service type, though called just "http", actually denotes something more precise than just "any data transported using HTTP". The DNS-SD service type "http" should only be used to advertise content that: * is served over HTTP, * can be displayed by "typical" web browser client software, and * is intented primarily to be viewed by a human user. Of course, the definition of "typical web browser" is subjective, and may change over time, but for practical purposes the DNS-SD service type "http" can be understood as meaning "human-readable HTML content served over HTTP". In some cases other widely-supported content types may also be appropriate, such as plain text over HTTP, or JPEG image over HTTP. Content types not intented primarily for viewing by a human user, or not widely-supported in web browsing clients, should not be advertised as DNS-SD service type "http", even if they do happen to be transported over HTTP. Such types should be advertised as their own logical service type with their own DNS-SD service type, for example, XUL (XML User Interface Language) transported over HTTP is advertised explicitly as DNS-SD service type "xul-http".
www-http 80 udp World Wide Web HTTP [Tim_Berners_Lee] [Tim_Berners_Lee] This is a duplicate of the "http" service and should not be used for discovery purposes. u=<username> p=<password> path=<path to document> (see txtrecords.html#http) Known Subtypes: _printer NOTE: The meaning of this service type, though called just "http", actually denotes something more precise than just "any data transported using HTTP". The DNS-SD service type "http" should only be used to advertise content that: * is served over HTTP, * can be displayed by "typical" web browser client software, and * is intented primarily to be viewed by a human user. Of course, the definition of "typical web browser" is subjective, and may change over time, but for practical purposes the DNS-SD service type "http" can be understood as meaning "human-readable HTML content served over HTTP". In some cases other widely-supported content types may also be appropriate, such as plain text over HTTP, or JPEG image over HTTP. Content types not intented primarily for viewing by a human user, or not widely-supported in web browsing clients, should not be advertised as DNS-SD service type "http", even if they do happen to be transported over HTTP. Such types should be advertised as their own logical service type with their own DNS-SD service type, for example, XUL (XML User Interface Language) transported over HTTP is advertised explicitly as DNS-SD service type "xul-http".
http 80 sctp HTTP [Randall_Stewart] [Randall_Stewart] [RFC4960] Defined TXT keys: u=<username> p=<password> path=<path to document>
81 Unassigned 2007-09-06
xfer 82 tcp XFER Utility [Thomas_M_Smith] [Thomas_M_Smith]
xfer 82 udp XFER Utility [Thomas_M_Smith] [Thomas_M_Smith]
mit-ml-dev 83 tcp MIT ML Device [David_Reed] [David_Reed]
mit-ml-dev 83 udp MIT ML Device [David_Reed] [David_Reed]
ctf 84 tcp Common Trace Facility [Hugh_Thomas] [Hugh_Thomas]
ctf 84 udp Common Trace Facility [Hugh_Thomas] [Hugh_Thomas]
mit-ml-dev 85 tcp MIT ML Device [David_Reed] [David_Reed]
mit-ml-dev 85 udp MIT ML Device [David_Reed] [David_Reed]
mfcobol 86 tcp Micro Focus Cobol [Simon_Edwards] [Simon_Edwards]
mfcobol 86 udp Micro Focus Cobol [Simon_Edwards] [Simon_Edwards]
87 tcp any private terminal link [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
87 udp any private terminal link [Jon_Postel] [Jon_Postel]
kerberos 88 tcp Kerberos [B_Clifford_Neuman] [B_Clifford_Neuman]
kerberos 88 udp Kerberos [B_Clifford_Neuman] [B_Clifford_Neuman]
su-mit-tg 89 tcp SU/MIT Telnet Gateway [Mark_Crispin] [Mark_Crispin]
su-mit-tg 89 udp SU/MIT Telnet Gateway [Mark_Crispin] [Mark_Crispin]
dnsix 90 tcp DNSIX Securit Attribute Token Map [Charles_Watt] [Charles_Watt] PORT 90 also being used unofficially by Pointcast
dnsix 90 udp DNSIX Securit Attribute Token Map [Charles_Watt] [Charles_Watt] PORT 90 also being used unofficially by Pointcast
mit-dov 91 tcp MIT Dover Spooler [Eliot_Moss] [Eliot_Moss]
mit-dov 91 udp MIT Dover Spooler [Eliot_Moss] [Eliot_Moss]
npp 92 tcp Network Printing Protocol [Louis_Mamakos] [Louis_Mamakos]
npp 92 udp Network Printing Protocol [Louis_Mamakos] [Louis_Mamakos]

People

ID Name Organization Contact URI Last Updated
[B_Clifford_Neuman] B. Clifford Neuman mailto:bcn&isi.edu
[Bill_Croft] Bill Croft mailto:Croft&sumex-aim.stanford.edu
[Bob_Braden] Bob Braden mailto:Braden&isi.edu
[Charles_Watt] Charles Watt mailto:watt&sware.com
[Christopher_Leong] Christopher Leong mailto:leong&kolmod.mlo.dec.com
[Dan_Smith] Dan Smith mailto:dan.smith&den.galileo.com
[David_Clark] David Clark mailto:ddc&lcs.mit.edu
[David_Reed] David Reed
[David_Zimmerman] David Zimmerman mailto:dpz&rutgers.edu
[E_Wald] E. Wald mailto:ewald&via.enet.dec.com
[Eliot_Moss] Eliot Moss mailto:EBM&xx.lcs.mit.edu
[Hugh_Thomas] Hugh Thomas mailto:thomas&oils.enet.dec.com
[Jack_Haverty] Jack Haverty mailto:jhaverty&oracle.com
[Jon_Postel] Jon Postel mailto:postel&isi.edu
[Kathy_Huber] Kathy Huber mailto:khuber&bbn.com
[Larry_Scott] Larry Scott mailto:scott&zk3.dec.com
[Louis_Mamakos] Louis Mamakos mailto:louie&sayshell.umd.edu
[Mark_Crispin] Mark Crispin mailto:MRC&panda.com
[Mark_McCahill] Mark McCahill mailto:mpm&boombox.micro.umn.edu
[Paul_Mockapetris] Paul Mockapetris mailto:PVM&isi.edu
[Pieter_Ditmars] Pieter Ditmars mailto:pditmars&bbn.com
[Randall_Stewart] Randall Stewart IETF TSVWG mailto:rrs&lakerest.net
[Rickard_Schoultz] Rickard Schoultz mailto:schoultz&sunet.se
[Robert_Ullmann] Robert Ullmann mailto:ariel&world.std.com
[Simon_Edwards] Simon Edwards
[Steve_Dorner] Steve Dorner mailto:s-dorner&uiuc.edu
[Steve_Kille] Steve Kille mailto:S.Kille&isode.com
[Susie_Armstrong] Susie Armstrong mailto:Armstrong.wbst128@xerox
[Thomas_M_Smith] Thomas M. Smith mailto:Thomas.M.Smith&lmco.com
[Tim_Berners_Lee] Tim Berners-Lee mailto:timbl&w3.org